Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for June, 2014

We had to come home for a few days to pick up some more of our stuff.  We had underestimated how much we had and overestimated how much needed to be thrown away. The most important thing we came back for was all my plants.  I had started DSC_0244growing a bunch of perennials and herbs that I wanted to attempt to save.  We have only a little space and only a little time, so I hope I didn’t just kill everything, but we will find out soon enough.  Basically, I dug them up, shook off the dirt, wrapped the roots in sopping wet towels, and bagged them up.  This is similar to how I got my trees from the nursery, so it may just be ok.  Hopefully I can get them in the ground quick enough.

DSC_0246

Butterfly Bush

Angelica

Angelica

DSC_0250

Blackberries packaged up

Lemon balm

Rugosa rose hips

Rugosa rose hips

Comfrey with flowers

Comfrey with flowers

Oversized comfrey that fell over

Oversized comfrey that fell over

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Happy Summer Solstice

This is how we spent ours!  Home with Gramma for the weekend and at the beach.DSC_0264

Read Full Post »

Even though it is too late to really get a garden going, I figured I would at least plant some squash beds.  I’m putting them among the trees in my orchard, so it is relatively shady right now, but hopefully one we clear a little more, the sun will kick the plants into full gear and we will have some squash this year.  I wish I had more time earlier to plant a garden, but it just didn’t work out that way.

I believe I have talked about hugelkulture beds before, but in case I haven’t I’ll do so quickly now.  Hugelkulture beds are basically compost piles that you grow your plants right in.  There is a bit of layering to do, but a really easy set up depending on how big you want to go.  I made about a three foot bed for each kind of squash.  This style of bed should be a good growing bed for years to come.  It feeds the plants very well as the compost breaks down right in place.  The decomposing organic material also acts like a sponge and holds water right in place where the plants need it.  However, they are also a raised bed and will adequately drain if there is too much water.

Step 1: clear some topsoil

Step 1: clear some topsoil

 

 

What I did was dig about a three foot wide hole, just deep enough to get the topsoil and put it aside.

 

 

 

Step 2: Big logs

Step 2: Big logs

 

 

Next, I piled big rotting logs in the hole.

 

 

 

 

DSC_0224

Step 3: Smaller sticks

 

 

On top of that I piled smaller rotting logs and on like that for a bit.

 

 

 

 

Step 4: Leaves

Step 4: Leaves

 

 

On top of the layers of rotting wood I put a layer of leaves.

 

 

 

 

DSC_0230

Step 5: Topsoil

The final layer was the topsoil I had saved.  I had to get a little more topsoil from around the pile since the pile was pretty big.  I would guess about two feet tall with the soil on top.  Then I planted the seeds kind of randomly throughout the pile, trying to give each one room.  They were probably more close together than you would normally plant squash, but I felt that the huge amount of food and moisture that these beds would provide would be more than adequate even if all ten plants grew well.  I don’t really know, but we will find out.

Here is a video on hugelkulture from the pros at permies.com.

Read Full Post »

Tent city

Tent city

Our experience so far has been nothing short of interesting.   Our first night here, we didn’t sleep because we couldn’t find the air mattress pump that plugged into the car and the new one we bought didn’t have any adaptors.  We slept on blankets on the ground.  Luckily, the kids had their beds, so they slept great.  Our first morning we woke up to rain that wasn’t supposed to come for at least another day.  We set up the tent city in the rain with two children who just wanted to play outside.  We had to set up another tent because we weren’t comfortable with the kids sleeping in the canvas one pole tent we had shared with them the night before.  The next morning we woke up in big puddles.  “The rain got me,” the little girl told me.  We hadn’t set up the tarps well enough to keep all the rain out, but we were mostly dry, just not the beds.  I popped the air mattress trying to set it up in the rain.  I had to head to town for about the 100th time to get supplies we didn’t plan on needing.   Last night, we finally had a good night and the rain has stopped.  Tomorrow I go in for a job interview that looks like it will be a great job.  Keep your fingers crossed for me!  This job could make our lives so much easier right now.  In fact, things would be perfect.  The only other thing we are waiting for is the more permanent living situation to arrive on site.  We have had a trying experience so far, but it will all be worth it.

Read Full Post »

Apple blossoms

Apple blossoms

We were gone for five weeks after planting the baby trees that are to become the food forest.  I was very nervous about them surviving the local deer population, especially given the lack of protecting I was able to provide in the short time we were here.  However, almost everything survived and is doing well.  The only plants that don’t have green leaves are the one grape and about half of the raspberries.  The raspberries would have excited me if only one survived since these were given the least care out of everything.  They were bottom on the priority list only because they take very little time to establish.  We could afford to lose a year of raspberry growth, but not tree growth.  I’m pretty sad about the grapes though.  Grapes are my favorite out of everything.  I’m keeping my fingers crossed that they are just slow to start.  Time will tell.  Sorry, yet again, that

DSC_0201the pictures aren’t great.  We have very little sunlight on the lot right now, so good pictures are going to be hard to get.  Once we clear some more (whenever that will be) the pictures will be much better.  Either way, it looks like the food forest is off to a great start.  I can’t wait until next year when we have more time and money to invest in this part of the grand project.  Hopefully in a couple years we will start getting fruit from these trees.  I’m not sure what that first tree is doing growing blossoms already, but I’ll just go with how nice it looks rather than getting excited about getting fruit already.  I should probably pinch the blossoms off so that the tree doesn’t waste energy trying to make fruit.  I will have to look into that.

DSC_0205 DSC_0203

 

Read Full Post »

DSC_0190

Looking across the dam

Main street

Main street

DSC_0189

Local tavern

Since it was supposed to pour all day today, I was doing some errands in town.  I figured this was a good chance to share a little bit of the area I moved to.  Sorry about the gray of the pictures, but like I said, it was a rainy day.  These were also taken through my windshield while I was parked in different places through town, so they aren’t the best, but I’ll do a better job some day when I have more time.

Local pizzeria

Local pizzeria

One of many antique shops

One of many antique shops

DSC_0208

Kennebec banks

DSC_0207

Heading to town

Almost home

Almost home

 

Read Full Post »

Tomorrow morning, bright and early, we head out of town 6 hours down the road, and into the woods to begin our new homestead.  Starting totally from scratch, this will be this biggest adventure this family will ever have.  Now, I have a lot more work to do to get ready send me energy and motivation to load the truck in the downpour.  Thanks!

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Fun E Farm

One Family's Adventures in the Search for Sustainability

Our Adoption Story

Adoption, breastfeeding, lactation induction

WORLD ORGANIC NEWS

Decarbonise the air, Recarbonise the soil!

In the middle

For all those stuck in the middle!

A Gentleman's Farm

Life on the homestead with a librarian and a chef.

New Hampshire Garden Solutions

Exploring Nature in New Hampshire

resilient health

promoting, enriching & sustaining resilient health

Wyrmflight

A blog for kids (and everyone else) who love dragons.